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Articles posted on Friday, July 13, 2012

The Toughest Challenger Yet to the iPad

Friday, July 13, 2012
Category: Technology

From finance.yahoo.com

Tired of watching in frustration as its popular Android mobile operating system failed to make much of a dent in the tablet market, Google is stepping in next week with an Android tablet it helped design.

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Megaupload and the twilight of copyright

Friday, July 13, 2012
Category: Internet

From tech.fortune.cnn.com

The Supreme Court has never retreated from, or even tweaked, the broad wording of the Sony Betamax ruling, which is now revered in tech circles as the Magna Carta of the technology age. That′s because almost every new technology is dual use -- capable of being put to both legal and illegal purposes.

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In Japan, Players Like the Yankees’ Kuroda Was Built by Suffering

Friday, July 13, 2012
Category: Sports

From www.nytimes.com

Born in 1975, Kuroda is one of the last of a cohort of Japanese players who grew up in a culture in which staggeringly long work days and severe punishment were normal, and in which older players could haze younger ones with impunity.

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Hayek von Pinochet

Friday, July 13, 2012
Category: History

From coreyrobin.com

In his defense of Pinochet (and elsewhere), Hayek invokes the oft-repeated distinction between totalitarian and authoritarian societies, and though Farrant et al don’t mention this, it struck me that this old saw—so beloved of figures like Jeanne Kirkpatrick—might have served as some of the glue holding together neoconservatives like Kirkpatrick and neoliberals like Hayek, especially in the 1970s.

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Is the Internet Making Us Crazy? What the New Research Says

Confirmed highly mobile-friendly site

Friday, July 13, 2012
Category: Behavior

From www.thedailybeast.com

The first good, peer-reviewed research is emerging, and the picture is much gloomier than the trumpet blasts of Web utopians have allowed. The current incarnation of the Internet—portable, social, accelerated, and all-pervasive—may be making us not just dumber or lonelier but more depressed and anxious, prone to obsessive-compulsive and attention-deficit disorders, even outright psychotic.

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A Shotgun for Blood Clots

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Friday, July 13, 2012
Category: Health

From news.sciencemag.org

Blood clots are bad news for the brain, heart, and other organs. These masses of blood cells can grow big enough to choke off veins and arteries, preventing oxygen from flowing to critical organs. One of the chief obstacles to dealing with blood clots is finding where they have lodged in the body.

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Simon Johnson: Lie More, as a Business Model

Friday, July 13, 2012
Category: Finance

From economix.blogs.nytimes.com

No one will believe large banks again when their executives assert that they could have borrowed at a particular interest rate; we will need to see actual transaction data, i.e., what they actually paid.

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How Morocco Dodged the Arab Spring by Nicolas Pelham

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Friday, July 13, 2012
Category: World

From www.nybooks.com

whereas Ben Ali, Tunisia’s policeman, pigheadedly sought to keep power when the streets erupted in late 2010, Morocco’s po-faced but retiring King has kept one step ahead by offering to share it. On March 9, 2011—just weeks after Ben Ali’s exile—King Mohammed unveiled a new constitution that gave up his claim to divine rights as sovereign, but left him as Commander of the Faithful, much—said palace advisers—as Britain’s Queen remains head of the Anglican Church.

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The cat gap

Friday, July 13, 2012
Category: Science

From en.wikipedia.org

The cat gap is a period in the fossil record of approximately 25 to 18.5 million years ago in which there are few fossils of cats or cat-like species found in North America.

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