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Phoenix Cluster Sets Record Pace at Forming Stars

Friday, August 17, 2012
Category: Science

From www.cfa.harvard.edu

Astronomers have found an extraordinary galaxy cluster, one of the largest objects in the universe, that is breaking several important cosmic records. Observations of the Phoenix cluster with NASA′s Chandra X-ray Observatory, the National Science Foundation′s South Pole Telescope, and eight other world-class observatories may force astronomers to rethink how these colossal structures and the galaxies that inhabit them evolve.

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When Seeing Isn’t Believing

Monday, August 13, 2012
Category: Science

From blogs.scientificamerican.com

People who have suffered newly acquired vision loss from eye conditions such as macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy or cataracts (or from damage to other parts of the visual pathway in the brain) can have new visual field defects as a result and sometimes they begin to “see” things that really aren’t there.

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The beginnings of life: Chemistry’s grand question

Sunday, August 12, 2012
Category: Science

From blogs.scientificamerican.com

Nobody knows how a mixture of amino acids, sugars, lipids and nucleotides forms proteins, enzymes and functional DNA and RNA, let alone makes the momentous leap into achieving a self-containing, replicating and metabolizing reaction system.

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Discovering science

Tuesday, August 7, 2012
Category: Science

From radar.oreilly.com

What do “right” and “wrong” mean in this context? Those terms are only marginally useful. And the notion of physical “law” is even less useful. “Laws” are really semantic constructs, and the appearance of the words “physical law” usually signify that someone has missed the point.

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Artificial jellyfish built from rat cells

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Saturday, July 28, 2012
Category: Science

From www.nature.com

Bioengineers have made an artificial jellyfish using silicone and muscle cells from a rat’s heart. The synthetic creature, dubbed a medusoid, looks like a flower with eight petals. When placed in an electric field, it pulses and swims exactly like its living counterpart.

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The Strange Neuroscience of Immortality

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Monday, July 23, 2012
Category: Science

From chronicle.com

In 1986, researchers did manage to map the nervous system of a millimeter-long soil worm known as C. elegans. Though the creature has only 302 neurons and 7,000 synapses, the project took a dozen years.

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Memories Clutter Brain In Amnesia

Friday, July 20, 2012
Category: Science

From www.sciencenews.org

In a paradoxical twist, people with amnesia can get bogged down by too many memories. Unwanted, irrelevant information crowds in and prevents amnesiac patients from recognizing objects, scientists report in the July 12 Neuron.

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What would disprove evolution?

Wednesday, July 18, 2012
Category: Science

From whyevolutionistrue.wordpress.com

A list of seven observations that, if repeated and confirmed, would disprove parts of the theory of evolution described above. This shows that it is a scientific theory in the Popperian sense of being falsifiable.

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Tiny Bubbles Explain Puzzle about Light from Sound: Scientific American

Tuesday, July 17, 2012
Category: Science

From www.scientificamerican.com

espite 70 years of trying, scientists still cannot fully explain how a bubble of air in water focuses acoustic energy a trillionfold to spit out picosecond bursts of ultraviolet radiation. Initially physicists attributed the flashes to friction.

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The genetics of stupidity

Sunday, July 15, 2012
Category: Science

From wiringthebrain.blogspot.ie

Mutations that lower intelligence could be quite non-specific, diverse and far more idiosyncratic. The idea of a finite, stable and discrete set of variants that specifically contribute to intelligence levels and that simply get shuffled around in human populations may be a fallacy.

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