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Behavior

The origins of power

Thursday, August 9, 2012
Category: Behavior

From www.thersa.org

Armies have a pyramid-like hierarchical structure, with one general at the top, many soldiers at the bottom and various officers ranked between them. Armies can serve a defensive function â€" to protect people and their properties â€" or an offensive one: to kill people and take or destroy their properties.

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Do higher speed limits cause more accidents?

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Monday, July 30, 2012
Category: Behavior

From www.slate.com

What a raised speed limit probably won’t do is inflate the number of collisions. It’s often assumed that higher caps will make roadways more dangerous, because motorists will exceed whatever ceiling is in place.

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The parable of the ox

Sunday, July 29, 2012
Category: Behavior

From www.johnkay.com

Once weight-guessing competitions became the rage, some participants tried to cheat. They even sought privileged information from the farmer who had bred the ox. It was feared that if some people had an edge, others would be reluctant to enter the weight-guessing competition.

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Where Does the Endowment Effect Come From?

Wednesday, July 18, 2012
Category: Behavior

From peerreviewedbymyneurons.wordpress.com

One of many notches on the belts of Richard Thaler and Daniel Kahneman is the “Endowment Effect” — the tendency to place a higher value on things you own. Technically, it’s when the price you’re willing to pay for something is less than the price you’re willing to sell it for.

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Racial bias colours visual perception

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Monday, July 16, 2012
Category: Behavior

From www.nature.com

The researchers presented low-contrast images of white, Moroccan and black faces to one eye and high-contrast changing patterns to the other. At first, the study participants were aware of seeing only the patterns.

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Is the Internet Making Us Crazy? What the New Research Says

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Friday, July 13, 2012
Category: Behavior

From www.thedailybeast.com

The first good, peer-reviewed research is emerging, and the picture is much gloomier than the trumpet blasts of Web utopians have allowed. The current incarnation of the Internet—portable, social, accelerated, and all-pervasive—may be making us not just dumber or lonelier but more depressed and anxious, prone to obsessive-compulsive and attention-deficit disorders, even outright psychotic.

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We Beat Young People With a Stick Called ′The Future′

Wednesday, July 11, 2012
Category: Behavior

From www.psychologytoday.com

The future matters â€" of course it does â€" but so does the past. It’s normal for young people to want to look backwards. Looking backwards doesn’t mean being immature. It’s like when you think you’ve got to the top of the mountain.

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Unethical behavior can become contagious

Saturday, July 7, 2012
Category: Behavior

From www.psychologytoday.com

If unethical behaviors are known (or rumored) and the performer still gets rewards, it can create the impression that these bad behaviors are acceptable. In this way, one cheater can lead to more cheating by others: first, by creating a standard that can only be met by cheating; and second, by contributing to a belief that everyone is doing it.

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The Essential Psychopathology Of Creativity

Friday, July 6, 2012
Category: Behavior

From hplusmagazine.com

Is there a difference between being hypomanic and being extremely creative? Yes, there is. While being an intensely creative person may imply you are meeting most of those criteria a lot of the time when you are in that state of flow, that doesn’t mean you are dysfunctional.

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Why Do People Pay for Useless Advice?

Thursday, July 5, 2012
Category: Behavior

From ftp.iza.org

Traditional economists attribute such behaviors to random error in decision-making. This is the notion that an average person is disinclined to commit such errors, and that people rationally pay for advice only if it does not seem logically counterintuitive at the time of purchase but that is potentially useless ex post.

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